Feel Whole Again

Did you know that 1 in 2 women may experience pelvic organ displacement (prolapse) in their lifetime?1

What is Pelvic Organ Prolapse?

Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) occurs when the tissues that hold the pelvic organs in place become weak or stretched, resulting in the drop (prolapse) of the pelvic organs from their normal position.

Prolapse is caused by muscles and ligaments that have been weakened or damaged. The most common causes of prolapse include1:

  • Pregnancy
  • Obesity
  • Childbirth
  • Aging
  • Menopause
  • Genetics
  • Previous surgery

If you have signs and symptoms of POP, learning more about this condition (and discovering you have treatment options) may lead to a better way of life.

There are several types of pelvic organ prolapse

There are several specific types of prolapse that contribute to the overall condition of POP. It’s helpful to know about each type, since many women may experience more than one.

Cystocele

A cystocele is formed when the bladder bulges or herniates into the vagina.

Enterocele

An enterocele is formed when the small bowel bulges or herniates into the vagina.

Rectocele

A rectocele occurs when the rectum bulges or herniates into the vagina.

Uterine prolapse

A uterine prolapse occurs when the uterus falls into the vagina.

Vaginal vault prolapse

A vaginal vault prolapse occurs when the upper part of the vagina falls into the vaginal canal.

Healthy Pelvic Area Before Prolapse

Typical Pelvic Anatomy

Cystocele

(pronounced "cyst-o-seal")

A cystocele is formed when the bladder bulges or herniates into the vagina.

Enterocele

(pronounced "enter-o-seal")

An enterocele is formed when the small bowel bulges or herniates into the vagina.

Rectocele

(pronounced "rect-o-seal")

A rectocele is formed when the rectum bulges or herniates into the vagina.

Uterine prolapse

A uterine prolapse occurs when the uterus falls into the vagina.

Vaginal vault prolapse

A vaginal vault prolapse occurs when the upper part of the vagina falls into the vaginal canal.

Suffering from embarrassing lack of bladder control?

If you’re coping with pelvic organ prolapse, you could be suffering from stress urinary incontinence (SUI) as well. Many of the causes are connected.

Click here to learn more about SUI.

Reference:

  1. Jelovsek JE, Maher C, Barber MD. Pelvic organ prolapse. Lancet. 2007;369(9566):1027-1038.

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